Overweight Kids Pay a Heavy Social Price

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on HealthDay.

Overweight kids are excluded and ostracized by classmates in school more often than their thinner peers, new research indicates.

Examining friendship dynamics among more than 500 preteens in the Netherlands, California researchers found that those who were overweight or obese were 1.7 times more likely to be disliked by their peers.

Not surprisingly, the reverse was also true. Overweight or obese preteens were 1.2 times more likely to dislike their peers, the study revealed.

Study author Kayla de la Haye is an assistant professor of preventive medicine at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine. She also led earlier research that reinforces the new findings, which she said would be similar in the United States.

“We consistently find overweight kids are ostracized by their peers, which plays out over middle school and high school to the point where they’re pushed to the periphery of these big social groups,” de la Haye said.

“We really need to take this seriously,” she added. “Experiencing stigma has such big implications for these kids, impacting their social development and mental health, and probably their physical health.”

The number of obese children in the United States has tripled since 1970, now comprising about 17 percent of all American children, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Meanwhile, childhood obesity worldwide rose by nearly one-third in just over 20 years, with about 42 million overweight or obese children in 2013, according to the World Health Organization.

De la Haye and her team based their findings on questionnaires given to children between the ages of 10 and 12 in classroom groups, who were asked to list their best friends and enemies.

Approximately one in six kids was overweight.

Overall, children were listed as a friend by five classmates and as an enemy by two. Overweight kids, however, were considered a friend by four classmates and were disliked by three. They were more likely to call classmates friends when the feeling wasn’t mutual and they disliked greater numbers of their classmates than their thinner peers, the study found.

A vicious cycle can stem from these negative peer interactions, de la Haye said. Overweight children who feel socially isolated may end up eating more and participating less in sports and physical activities, leading to further weight gain.

“The medical community and [larger] community think they can’t make obesity OK” because of its associated health risks, she said. “That sort of dominates the conversation. But we can’t buy into this argument anymore that stigma is OK.”

The study was published June 7 in the journal PLOS One.

Source: HealthDay
https://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/overweight-kids-health-news-517/overweight-kids-pay-a-heavy-social-price-723483.html

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[reposted by] Jim Liebelt

[reposted by] Jim Liebelt

Jim is Senior Writer, Editor and Researcher for the HomeWord Center for Youth and Family. Jim has over 30 years of experience as a youth and family ministry specialist, having served over the years as a pastor, author, consultant, mentor, trainer, college instructor, and speaker. Jim’s HomeWord culture blog also appears on Crosswalk.com and Religiontoday.com. Jim and his wife Jenny live in Quincy, MA.

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