TV/Video Games in Bedroom Can Lead to Child Issues

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on PsychCentral.

New research suggests that when a child has a TV or video games in their bedroom, negative consequences may happen.

Iowa State University investigators discovered bedroom access to TV or video games resulted in children spending less time reading, sleeping or participating in other activities. In turn, these children did not do as well in school and were at greater risk for obesity and video game addiction.

Douglas Gentile, lead author and professor of psychology, says the research shows the location of video access really does matter for kids.

Researchers were able to track the detrimental effects over a period of six months to two years. They also found that children with bedroom media watched programs and played video games that were more violent, which increased levels of physical aggression.

Gentile says it stands to reason that most parents are not fully aware of what is happening behind closed doors.

The study appears in the journal Developmental Psychology.

“When most children turn on the TV alone in their bedroom, they’re probably not watching educational shows or playing educational games,” Gentile said. “Putting a TV in the bedroom gives children 24-hour access and privatizes it in a sense, so as a parent you monitor less and control their use of it less.”

The study utilizes data from Gentile’s previous studies on screen time and media content. The new study found that having bedroom media significantly changes the amount of time children spend with media, and changes the content they view. Moreover, bedroom access also changes what children do not do, such as reading.

Investigators believe some of the new findings are a reflection of the digital media environment.

Several studies have tracked changes in children’s screen time. Gentile says that number continues to trend upward, nearing close to 60 hours a week that children spend in front of screens.

National studies show that more than 40 percent of children, ages 4-6, have a TV in their bedroom, and a substantial majority of children 8 and older have a TV or video game console in their bedrooms.

While this study looked specifically at TVs and video games in the bedroom, Gentile expects the effects to be the same, if not stronger, given the access children now have to digital devices.

He has talked with parents worried about their child’s digital media use or how best to set limits. Their concerns range from children accessing questionable content to responding in the middle of the night to text messages or social media alerts, he said.

It is a challenge Gentile says he too has faced as a parent, but he encourages others to keep media out of their children’s bedroom. It may cause a battle in the short term, but will benefit children in the long term.

“It’s a lot easier for parents to never allow a TV in the bedroom than it is to take it out,” he said. “It’s a question every parent must face, but there is a simple two-letter answer. That two-letter answer is tough, but it is worth it.”

Source: PsychCentral
https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/09/27/tvvideo-games-in-bedroom-can-lead-to-child-issues/126596.html

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[reposted by] Jim Liebelt

[reposted by] Jim Liebelt

Jim is Senior Writer, Editor and Researcher for the HomeWord Center for Youth and Family. Jim has over 30 years of experience as a youth and family ministry specialist, having served over the years as a pastor, author, consultant, mentor, trainer, college instructor, and speaker. Jim’s HomeWord culture blog also appears on Crosswalk.com and Religiontoday.com. Jim and his wife Jenny live in Quincy, MA.

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