School Success Requires As Much Self-Control as Intelligence

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on PsychCentral.

Being a successful student may require just as much self-control as intelligence, according to new research published in Perspectives on Psychological Science.

Although most students recognize the importance of education, when they are faced with yet another lecture or homework assignment, nearly all students in one survey said they wished they were doing something else.

“Everyone’s been in this situation, where you’ve got this piece of chocolate cake in front of you and you don’t really want to eat it but you’re so compelled to, and I think students feel this way all the time with their work,” said coauthor Angela Duckworth, a professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania known for her research on “grit” as a pathway to achievement.

For the research, Duckworth and her colleagues followed 304 eighth-graders. They measured students’ self-control through self-reports, questionnaires completed by parents and teachers, and a set of behavioral delay-of-gratification tasks.

Their findings show that, similar to IQ, students who were rated highly for self-control earned higher grades and standardized test scores. Unlike IQ, however, higher self-control was also linked to fewer school absences, less procrastination, more time spent studying, and less time spent watching television.

Duckworth, who taught middle school math before becoming a university professor, said these findings mirror her own experiences in the classroom.

“Kids actually want to do well,” Duckworth said. “I’ve never met a kid who wants to do worse, but not all of them were able to align their behavior with studying, with homework, with paying attention in class.”

Based on a study of 1,000 students in New Zealand, the researchers also found that ratings of self-control in childhood were just as predictive of a person’s financial security, income, physical and mental health, substance use, and criminal convictions later in life as intelligence or socioeconomic status.

Although self-control can be grouped with conscientiousness, a Big Five personality trait, it also stands as a unique behavioral measure that may significantly impact a person’s overall success.

Self-control exists on the timescale of minutes, said Duckworth. For example, self-control helps someone resist the everyday temptations of texting in class or hitting the snooze button in the morning, whereas grit may provide the persevering passion required to accomplish long-term goals such as winning the National Spelling Bee or getting into your first-choice college.

Source: PsychCentral
https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/12/29/school-success-requires-as-much-self-control-as-intelligence/130535.html

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[reposted by] Jim Liebelt

[reposted by] Jim Liebelt

Jim is Senior Writer, Editor and Researcher for the HomeWord Center for Youth and Family. Jim has over 30 years of experience as a youth and family ministry specialist, having served over the years as a pastor, author, consultant, mentor, trainer, college instructor, and speaker. Jim’s HomeWord culture blog also appears on Crosswalk.com and Religiontoday.com. Jim and his wife Jenny live in Quincy, MA.

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