Negative Experiences on Social Media Tied to Loneliness

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on PsychCentral.

Using social media does not appear to reduce feelings of loneliness. In fact, it can make you feel more lonely, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

The findings reveal that social media users do not feel more connected even after engaging in positive experiences on the site; but they do feel more lonely after the negative experiences.

The study builds on 2017 research suggesting that more use of social media is associated with increased feelings of loneliness.

“Social media is, seemingly, about connecting people. So it is surprising and interesting that our investigations reveal social media being linked to loneliness,” said lead author Brian Primack, M.D., Ph.D., director of at the University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Research on Media Technology and Health (MTH) and Dean of Pitt’s Honors College.

“Perceived social isolation, which is a synonym for loneliness, is associated with poor health outcomes, such as high blood pressure, heart disease and depression. Because social media is so pervasive, it is critically important that we better understand why this is happening and how we can help people navigate social media without as many negative consequences.”

For the new study, the researchers surveyed 1,178 West Virginia University students ages 18 to 30 about their social media use, to what extent their experiences were positive or negative, and their level of perceived loneliness. The authors investigated these perceptions of social media interactions across whatever combination of platforms students were using.

The findings show that, for every 10 percent increase in negative experiences on social media, the participants reported a 13 percent increase in feelings of loneliness. Yet for every 10 percent increase in positive experiences on social media, the participants reported no statistically significant change in feelings of loneliness.

It is not clear whether individuals who feel lonely are seeking out or attracting negative social media experiences, or if they are having negative social media experiences that are leading to perceived isolation, said author Jaime Sidani, Ph.D., who also is assistant director of Pitt’s MTH.

The researchers say more research is needed to further explain and replicate the study, but the findings are strong enough to warrant efforts to intervene now to reduce feelings of loneliness associated with social media use.

Source: PsychCentral
https://psychcentral.com/news/2019/01/24/negative-experiences-on-social-media-tied-to-loneliness/142255.html

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[reposted by] Jim Liebelt

[reposted by] Jim Liebelt

Jim is Senior Writer, Editor and Researcher for the HomeWord Center for Youth and Family. Jim has over 30 years of experience as a youth and family ministry specialist, having served over the years as a pastor, author, consultant, mentor, trainer, college instructor, and speaker. Jim’s HomeWord culture blog also appears on Crosswalk.com and Religiontoday.com. Jim and his wife Jenny live in Quincy, MA.

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