Many Anorexia Patients Recover Over Time

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on PsychCentral.

A long-term Swedish study of around 50 people who struggled with anorexia nervosa in their teens shows that the majority were healthy 30 years later.

The study, published in The British Journal of Psychiatry, was conducted by researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by weight loss or the lack of appropriate weight gain in growing children. Many anorexia patients struggle with a distorted body image. In general, patients severely restrict the number of calories and the types of foods they eat. Some also exercise compulsively, purge via vomiting and laxatives, and/or binge eat.

Of children and adolescents in Sweden, approximately 1 percent of girls and 0.1 percent of boys develop anorexia. The primary treatment is psychotherapy, aimed at changing the victims’ eating behaviors and helping them cope with their problematic emotions.

The study was initiated in Gothenburg in 1985. Every child in the eighth grade of compulsory school (born 1970) was screened for anorexia nervosa. As a result, 24 adolescents with the disorder were identified and given the opportunity of inclusion in the study. A further 27 adolescents with anorexia born in the early 1970s, who had attracted the attention of the school health services, were added.

Of the resulting total, 48 were women and 3 men. The study was supplemented with an equal number of matched healthy controls, bringing the total number of subjects to 102.

Thirty years after the study began, the researchers contacted the anorexic participants and the healthy controls again. All but four were included in the follow-up.

“Since the study’s partly population-based and includes only people who developed anorexia in their teens, we thought initially that our study participants should be doing better than people in clinical long-term follow-ups, in which the participants were recruited through the care services,” said researcher Dr. Elisabet Wentz, Professor at Sahlgrenska Academy.

“In our study we see no deaths, which unfortunately occur in clinical studies. But as for full recovery from eating disorders, the outcome is the same as in other long-term studies. In line with other studies, 30 of the 47 respondents in the follow-up part of the study have fully recovered.”

One key purpose of the study was to identify factors tied to greater risk for developing anorexia nervosa. The findings indicate that age is one such factor: teens who were slightly older at onset had a better chance of regaining their health.

Source: PsychCentral
https://psychcentral.com/news/2019/05/29/many-anorexia-patients-recover-over-time/147349.html

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[reposted by] Jim Liebelt

[reposted by] Jim Liebelt

Jim is Senior Writer, Editor and Researcher for HomeWord. Jim has over 35 years of experience as a youth and family ministry specialist, having served over the years as a pastor, author, consultant, mentor, trainer, college instructor, and speaker. Jim’s HomeWord culture blog also appears on Crosswalk.com and Religiontoday.com. Jim and his wife Jenny live in Quincy, MA.

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