Teens Who Are Bullied Struggle With Long-Term Mental Health Issues

*The following is excerpted from an online article posted on the University of Michigan news website.

Bullying can make life miserable in the short term for teens, but its impact can also linger into young adulthood, says a University of Michigan researcher.

Much is known about the negative effects of bullying, ranging from depression to poor performance in school, but a new study indicates that bullied teens can suffer long-term mental health problems that last into early adulthood.

How these individuals perceive themselves contributes to these outcomes, said study author Janette Norrington, U-M doctoral student in sociology. The study, which appears in the journal Youth & Society, also indicates that verbal abuse and peer harassment are more harmful than physical victimization or social exclusion.

Norrington used longitudinal data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to examine teen self-concept as a mediator in the relationship between adolescent peer victimization and psychological distress in emerging adulthood.

Self-concept, which is the image people have of themselves or self-worth, is a link between teen bully victimization and later mental health. Bullying includes physically harming, making fun of, excluding, and spreading rumors about a person.

“Bully victimization damages how people view themselves in adolescence and that negative view can linger into adulthood, contributing to poor mental health,” she said.

Norrington examined the responses of more than 1,400 adolescents in 2002 and 2007, who were questioned about the frequency that classmates hit them and picked on them, had their things (money and lunch) taken and were left out of friends’ activities. In 2009 and 2013, as adults, they were asked how often in the past month they felt nervous, hopeless, sad and worthless.

Peer victimization was still associated with higher levels of psychological distress, but the impact lessened among those who had high self-esteem, the study found.

Source: University of Michigan
https://news.umich.edu/teens-who-are-bullied-struggle-with-long-term-mental-health-issues/

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[reposted by] Jim Liebelt

[reposted by] Jim Liebelt

Jim is Senior Writer, Editor and Researcher for HomeWord. Jim has over 35 years of experience as a youth and family ministry specialist, having served over the years as a pastor, author, consultant, mentor, trainer, college instructor, and speaker. Jim’s HomeWord culture blog also appears on Crosswalk.com and Religiontoday.com. Jim and his wife Jenny live in Quincy, MA.

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